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If you're recovering from an injury accident and you begin to feel depressed, you're not alone. It is not uncommon to see people who have been injured in a car accident suffer from depression afterward. In fact, a study by British researchers found that at least one-third of people involved in nonfatal car crashes suffer some form of mental health issue within the first 12 months after the accident. This number even extends to people in minor accidents or who didn't suffer injuries! Let's talk about some of the underlying causes of why some people experience depression in the aftermath of a crash.

 

The Effect of Physical Injuries on Mental Health

 

The mind and body are more closely connected than many people realize. When you're otherwise physically fit, and an injury prevents you from performing basic tasks that were once easy for you, it can lead to feelings of frustration, helplessness, and loss—all of which can cause the development of depression. Numerous studies have also indicated that even minor physical injuries can trigger personality coping defenses that reveal depression and other mental health ailments for some people. 

 

The Trauma of the Accident Itself

 

No matter how you frame it, the impact of an accident is a trauma, both physical and emotional. If you've ever been in a car accident where the injuries sustained were major or life-threatening, you know that it is not an experience that you'll soon forget. Even the momentary flash of believing you're about to die is a traumatic trigger. For this reason, diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute anxiety—both of which include symptoms of depression—are quite common in the aftermath of an injury accident. 

 

Fear of the Future

 

An injury accident is highly disruptive, and for many people, it brings an overwhelming feeling of uncertainty. You may be concerned about finances and how you will pay the medical bills. You may be worried about how your injuries will change your life, whether they will permanently prevent you from making an income or doing the things you love. These worries commonly lead to depression, as well.

 

Because depression and other mental health issues are so typical with injury accident victims, it should come as no surprise that we often include "mental anguish" as one of the damages in a personal injury claim. If the effects of your injury accident are being compounded by debilitating depression, you should be compensated for this loss by the party responsible for your accident. Our personal injury attorneys can help you receive the compensation to which you're entitled. Give us a call today to schedule a consultation.

If you're recovering from an injury accident and you begin to feel depressed, you're not alone. It is not uncommon to see people who have been injured in a car accident suffer from depression afterward. In fact, a study by British researchers found that at least one-third of people involved in nonfatal car crashes suffer some form of mental health issue within the first 12 months after the accident. This number even extends to people in minor accidents or who didn't suffer injuries! Let's talk about some of the underlying causes of why some people experience depression in the aftermath of a crash.

 

The Effect of Physical Injuries on Mental Health

 

The mind and body are more closely connected than many people realize. When you're otherwise physically fit, and an injury prevents you from performing basic tasks that were once easy for you, it can lead to feelings of frustration, helplessness, and loss—all of which can cause the development of depression. Numerous studies have also indicated that even minor physical injuries can trigger personality coping defenses that reveal depression and other mental health ailments for some people. 

 

The Trauma of the Accident Itself

 

No matter how you frame it, the impact of an accident is a trauma, both physical and emotional. If you've ever been in a car accident where the injuries sustained were major or life-threatening, you know that it is not an experience that you'll soon forget. Even the momentary flash of believing you're about to die is a traumatic trigger. For this reason, diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute anxiety—both of which include symptoms of depression—are quite common in the aftermath of an injury accident. 

 

Fear of the Future

 

An injury accident is highly disruptive, and for many people, it brings an overwhelming feeling of uncertainty. You may be concerned about finances and how you will pay the medical bills. You may be worried about how your injuries will change your life, whether they will permanently prevent you from making an income or doing the things you love. These worries commonly lead to depression, as well.

 

Because depression and other mental health issues are so typical with injury accident victims, it should come as no surprise that we often include "mental anguish" as one of the damages in a personal injury claim. If the effects of your injury accident are being compounded by debilitating depression, you should be compensated for this loss by the party responsible for your accident. Our personal injury attorneys can help you receive the compensation to which you're entitled. Give us a call today to schedule a consultation.


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